The Line of Cain

When read­ing about the ear­ly chap­ters of Gen­e­sis — par­tic­u­lar­ly the events of Gen­e­sis 6 — it’s been rare to find the texts spo­ken about with­out ref­er­ence to the “ungod­ly line of Cain” and the “god­ly line of Seth.” I admit, for much of my Chris­t­ian life, I’ve judged Cain’s line by Cain’s actions, and Seth’s by Seth’s.

I’ve read Gen­e­sis 4 [amp] 5 umpteen times, and just about every time, I do so with the idea that Cain’s descen­dants are all patent­ly “ungod­ly,” in a way over and above the fall­en nature com­mon to all men.

And I admit, it does­n’t start well for that family. 

Cain spoke to Abel his broth­er. And when they were in the field, Cain rose up against his broth­er Abel and killed him. The Book of Gen­e­sis, 4:8

Mur­der. Count­less fam­i­lies have faced gen­er­a­tions of strife because of mur­der, and no doubt there are grim results to Cain’s self­ish act.

What imme­di­ate­ly hap­pens as a result of Cain’s dis­obe­di­ence? I would have expect­ed that Cain would be put to death — smote by Yah­weh for his dis­obe­di­ence. Harsh? Per­haps, but it would be a pun­ish­ment fit­ting the crime (Gen­e­sis 9:6).

What hap­pens, though, is the com­plete oppo­site: God has mer­cy on Cain. In a tes­ta­ment to the patience, the love, the grace, the pure mer­cy of God, his­to­ry’s first mur­der­er comes face to face not with a guil­lo­tine, noose, elec­tric chair, or ston­ing… but with a sec­ond chance.

And while Cain’s life would nev­er be the same, the Lord allowed him to at least have life. Cain would be an out­cast, a wan­der­er in the world, alien­at­ed from his par­ents and oth­er siblings.

The mer­cy just keeps on flow­ing, though, for when Cain points out how hat­ed he would be, that any­one who finds him would kill him, God places a mark upon Cain, a mark of pro­tec­tion, ensur­ing Cain that any­one who would attack him would be pun­ished sev­en­fold. It seems to me that God has a plan for Cain, and I don’t say that in the warm [amp] fuzzy way that the pros­per­i­ty or self-esteem preach­ers might say it. Rather, I’m say­ing it in the sense that God is sov­er­eign — a corol­lary to that is God has a plan for your life. Such it is with Cain.

Cain and Abel

The Land of Nod

Cain leaves his fam­i­ly. If you’re a par­ent of adults, you know what it’s like for your chil­dren to leave home. I don’t know that feel­ing, but I can imag­ine that it is difficult.

I can imag­ine it being much hard­er for Adam [amp] Eve. They had just lost one son to mur­der and, as a result, are now los­ing another.

At this point, I would expect the Scrip­tures to no longer tell us about Cain. Adam [amp] Eve bore him, he grew up, hard­ened his heart against God [amp] broth­er, mur­dered his broth­er, and was now exiled. What more could we pos­si­bly need to know?

God tells us that Cain “set­tled in the land of Nod, east of Eden” (v. 16. Do you know where Adam [amp] Eve, Seth, or even Noah dwelled? No? Nei­ther do I.

Yet we know where Cain, a man of unen­cum­bered evil (1 John 3:12), set­tled with his fam­i­ly. That’s inter­est­ing, isn’t it?

So Cain moves to Nod, the land of wan­der­ing, with the woman who would become his wife. Who was she? Suf­fice it to say, I believe she was his sis­ter; incest was not for­bid­den until much lat­er, and the rel­a­tive puri­ty of the human genome at this point would have pre­clud­ed any neg­a­tive birth affects due to inbreeding.

What do they do? They obey. That’s not what we typ­i­cal­ly think when we think of Cain is it? I’m not try­ing to make Cain out to be a saint — the elder apos­tle John says Cain was of the evil one — but he was a man who was fruit­ful. He mul­ti­plied. I doubt that he had chil­dren out a desire to obey; his child-bear­ing may have been moti­vat­ed by a desire to sur­round him­self with peo­ple who were not aware of his seedy past.

Or it may have sim­ply been a desire to have a fam­i­ly. Such a desire is very human.

Cain and his wife had a child Enoch, after whom Cain’s city was named (Gen­e­sis 4:17). Thus began the “[ungod­ly] line of Cain”:

The Line of Cain

Cain ⇒ Enoch ⇒ Irad ⇒ Mehu­jael ⇒ Methushael ⇒ Lamech

Of most of these men, we don’t know much, at least not until we get to Lamech (Gen­e­sis 4:18).

The first inter­est­ing thing we’re told about him? Lamech had two wives. I durst not say whether this was right or wrong of Lamech; the Scrip­tures do not record any sort of reproof of Lamech’s sex­u­al­i­ty, so make of it what you will. If you decide to defend Lamech, though, be fore­warned that doing so is a “thank­less job” which requires a stead­fast deter­mi­na­tion that few peo­ple seem to have nowa­days, at least so far as so-called “lost caus­es” are concerned.

What­ev­er the con­clu­sions regard­ing Lamech’s mar­i­tal rela­tion­ships, our cul­ture — and thou­sands of oth­er cul­tures through­out human his­to­ry — owe a great deal to his family.

One of his wives was Adah; she bore a son named Jabal who pio­neered ani­mal hus­bandry, mak­ing him the “father of those who dwell in tents and have live­stock” (v. 20). Jabal was­n’t their only son, and his broth­er Jubal helped rev­o­lu­tion­ize music as “the father of all those who play the lyre and pipe” (v. 21).

Lamech’s oth­er wife was Zil­lah, and she bore to Cain a son named Tubal-cain, a ground­break­ing met­al­work­er who was “the forg­er of all instru­ments of bronze and iron” (v. 22).

Tech­nol­o­gy. Music. Hus­bandry. Isn’t it inter­est­ing that that the sov­er­eign Lord would choose the “ungod­ly line” to bring such advance­ments into the world?

Through the tech­nol­o­gy pio­neered by Tubal-cain, the Israelites would forge the adorn­ments, fur­ni­ture, and items used in their worship.

Through the musi­cal instru­ments first devised by Jubal, the Israelites would wor­ship the Lord in song.

Through the hus­bandry skills passed down by Jabal, the Israelites would man­age the live­stock used not just for food but also for sacrifice.

I don’t know if any­one in Lamech’s fam­i­ly had faith in God. The text does­n’t tell us that, so I won’t spec­u­late. Whether they knew it or not, Lamech’s boys have a fan­tas­tic lega­cy, one which ben­e­fits us even today.

Lamech also had a daugh­ter (v. 22, Tubal-cain’s sis­ter Naamah. The imme­di­ate text does­n’t say much about her, and it’s at least a lit­tle pecu­liar that a daugh­ter would be men­tioned by name here. Even our first par­ents’ daugh­ers (6:4) are name­less in his­to­ry, but not Lamech’s. It’s almost as if she has been here memo­ri­al­ized; the spec­u­la­tion in this area is inter­est­ing to say the least.

Things were not all hap­py-go-lucky, rein­vent­ing-the-way-humans-do-soci­ety for the Lamech fam­i­ly, though.

The Vengeance of Lamech

We aren’t giv­en the specifics. Per­haps there was a dis­pute over what­ev­er was con­sid­ered wealth at that time. Per­haps there was an argu­ment over over the works of Lamech’s sons.

Per­haps, like so much sense­less vio­lence today, some­body sim­ply want­ed Lamech’s shoes.

What­ev­er hap­pened, a man wound­ed Lamech, and Lamech killed him (4:23). If we are to take Lamech’s word for it — and the Scrip­tures record no oth­er word for us to take — then I think we must con­clude that Lamech act­ed in self-defense. He killed the man not out of jeal­ousy-fueled sib­ling rival­ry. No, this was not like what hap­pened between Cain [amp] Abel. This was dif­fer­ent. Lamech had cause. Per­haps if Lamech had no act­ed in self-defense, that man would have killed him. Who’s to say that the man would have stopped at sim­ply wound­ing Lamech?

In this age espe­cial­ly — an age of no human gov­ern­ment, of no law enforcers — did not a man have the right to defend him­self, his fam­i­ly? I real­ly don’t know; the sub­ject of self defense once came up at the Fel­low­ship Hall, and I don’t think a con­clu­sive answer was ever deter­mined. I’d love some feed­back on this point from you!

The ESV Study Bible says this in its note on this passage:

Lamech’s response is out of pro­por­tion to the injury, show­ing his inor­di­nate venge­ful­ness. This, like his bigamy (v. 19), reveals his deprav­i­ty. His behav­ior reveals that the line of Cain is dom­i­nat­ed by those who have no regard for the lives of oth­ers or respect for the prin­ci­ple of monogamy that 2:23–24 endorses.

I’m a big fan of this study Bible, but I’m think­ing it’s way off base with this note. I don’t get the impres­sion that the Scrip­tures are intend­ing to paint the line of Cain as being “with­out regard for the lives of oth­ers” and so on. Actu­al­ly, aside from the judg­ment against Cain, we aren’t told of oth­er judg­ments against this fam­i­ly. Even Lamech, who the study Bible says demon­strat­ed his deprav­i­ty in a cou­ple of ways, receives no rebuke from the Lord.

Yet he even invokes the name of the Lord. His great-great-great-grand­pap­py Cain received God’s mer­cy [amp] pro­tec­tion after hav­ing killed Abel in cold blood.

Lamech is con­fi­dent in the mer­ci­ful­ness of the Lord; if Cain would receive sev­en­fold revenge for being killed, how much more should Lamech receive.

The ungod­ly line of Cain… Music mak­ers. Met­al­work­ers. Cat­tle rais­ers. Men who believed that the best defense is a good offense.

And maybe even Noah’s wife.

They may not have the god­ly lega­cy of Seth, Enoch, or Noah, but Cain’s line have had a pro­found impact upon humanity.

At least, that’s the impres­sion I get from the fourth chap­ter of Gen­e­sis. What about you?


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29 responses to “The Line of Cain”

  1. Allan Schroeder Avatar

    Very inter­est­ing read, I’m always amazed at how God can use any­one, regard­less of their past. Anoth­er thing that struck me… I went back and read Gen­e­sis Chap­ter 5 yes­ter­day, is that there were two sep­a­rate Enoch’s, and two sep­a­rate Lamech’s, one each from the “ungod­ly” line, and the oth­er two, in the most “God­ly” of lines…

  2. Glen H. Avatar
    Glen H.

    Very good post Rick. Barnes’ com­ment on v. 23 is: “Every pair of lines is a spec­i­men of the Hebrew par­al­lelism or rhythm of sen­ti­ment and style. They all belong to the syn­thet­ic, syn­ony­mous, or cog­nate par­al­lel, the sec­ond mem­ber reit­er­at­ing with empha­sis the first. Here we observe that Lamek was a poet;…”

    Some claim (Jew­ish Tra­di­tion) that v. 23 is speak­ing of two peo­ple here that Lamek killed. Cain his great-grand­fa­ther, and Tubal­cain his son. Jew­ish tra­di­tion goes that Lamek was blind and could­n’t see well, but was out hunt­ing with his son when they heard a noise. His son thought it was a wild beat so had Lamek draw his bow and kill him. When they got clos­er, and knew what they did, Lamek became angry and attacked his son. Arab writ­ers have a bit dif­fer­ent twist, but won’t get into it, cause it’s all spec­u­la­tion, just found it very inter­est­ing how they take it that he killed two peo­ple in that verse.

  3. Chai Tea Avatar
    Chai Tea

    Hi — I dis­cov­ered your blog through ref­er­ence at the Mod­ern Phar­isee, for which I’m very grateful!

    My ques­tion is — The whole line of Cain per­ished in the flood, did it not? So there went the ani­mal hus­bandry, the musi­cal incli­na­tion, and the forg­ing of met­al instruments. 

    Yet, they are record­ed as hav­ing come to civ­i­liza­tion through the line of Cain.

    I also find it inter­est­ing how close­ly the names in Cain’s line copy (they were prob­a­bly first as Seth was years younger) Seth’s line of ‘god­ly’ offspring.

    If you will look a lit­tle ahead in Scrip­ture, you will also see that God great­ly blessed Esau, although lat­er in Scrip­ture, it is record­ed that God said, “Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.”

    I look for­ward to a response. :) Please under­stand that I mean no dis­re­spect, these are just a cou­ple of obser­va­tions which I’ve nev­er voiced aloud for fear of dis­rupt­ing anoth­er’s faith.

    What I find most reas­sur­ing is that each of us stands indi­vid­u­al­ly before our God — not depen­dent upon the behav­ior or either our ances­tors or our offspring. :)

    Many thanks for let­ting me have a say.

    1. Rick Beckman Avatar

      I’m not con­vinced that the lines of Seth & Cain were com­plete­ly seg­re­gat­ed. It’d be remark­able if one half of the fam­i­ly was mak­ing all of these advances for­ward with­out shar­ing any of it with the oth­ers in the family.

      Noah and his fam­i­ly had to deal with every type of ani­mal while on the ark (and like­ly for some time after­ward), and it’s entire­ly fea­si­ble that the hus­bandry skills devel­oped and passed down by Cain’s line helped in this.

      And who knows, maybe part of Cain’s line sur­vived on the Ark as Noah’s wife. If any­thing, that would explain why her ances­try is spo­ken so high­ly of where­as we know very lit­tle about the line of Seth save for Enoch and Noah. It seems typ­i­cal to me that it’d be the woman to pass on more details about her fam­i­ly — not that that’s a bad thing at all!

    2. rodney Avatar
      rodney

      there were 2 of each flesh on the ark that includes cane lin­eage you can read of his off­spring in 1 st chron­i­cles 2–55 do a search on rechab as con­cern­ing esau the lord hat­ed him not for what he was in this earth age but for what he did in the first earth age at the fall of satan in rev­e­la­tions god is hap­py with 2 church­es read why and fol­low there example

      1. Hal Avatar
        Hal

        Rod­ney, you study the word of God I see. Keep up the good work and spread the truth!

  4. Matthias Avatar
    Matthias

    Who ist the painter of this painting?

    1. Rick Beckman Avatar

      Hon­est­ly, I have no idea. I thought I found it on Wiki­me­dia Com­mons, but I don’t see it there any­more. A Google Image search did­n’t help deter­mine its source either, though I saw it used by quite a num­ber of oth­er bloggers.

  5. BatLX Avatar
    BatLX

    Is it mere coin­ci­dence that the fel­low cain, the one slay­ing, looks like a zion­ist Ashke­nazi jew?? Note* This is not a slight to ALL jews no more than Charles Man­son is a mas­cot for all white peo­ple, just the truth.

  6. BatLX Avatar
    BatLX

    Accord­ing to some ancient texts, Adam had two wives, Lilith being before Eve, that account for dif­fer­ent lin­eages. Also, just to be fair, some oth­er texts pur­port that Eve had a trist with that ol dev­il, Satan to pro­duce Cain. His line being respon­si­ble for the attroc­i­ties through­out his­to­ry to date. Seth’s line went on to pro­duce the sheeple. Food for thought. Sacred-Texts and Scribd are real­ly good sites for discovery.

  7. Rick Beckman Avatar

    In your first com­ment, I have no idea what you’re talk­ing about.

    In your sec­ond com­ment, while the “Lilith” the­o­ry is inter­est­ing, it isn’t true. Stick with the Scriptures. :)

  8. Bill Mikelait Avatar
    Bill Mikelait

    I keep hear­ing about this “ungod­ly” line of Cain and this “god­ly” line of Seth. If this line was so god­ly, why did God destroy them all in the flood except for Noah and his fam­i­ly? I know there were a few peo­ple men­tioned in the line of Seth who sought after God but this hard­ly makes the whole line “god­ly”.

    GE 6:5 The LORD saw how great man’s wicked­ness on the earth had become, and that every incli­na­tion of the thoughts of his heart was only evil all the time. The LORD was griev­ed that he had made man on the earth, and his heart was filled with pain. 7 So the LORD said, “I will wipe mankind, whom I have cre­at­ed, from the face of the earth–men and ani­mals, and crea­tures that move along the ground, and birds of the air–for I am griev­ed that I have made them.” But Noah found favor in the eyes of the LORD.

    The Lord did not tell us in this pas­sage that he destroyed the earth with a flood because of the line of Cain.
    This “god­ly line” stuff prob­a­bly comes some­what from the belief that the “sons of God” who saw the “daugh­ters of men” were sons of Seth ver­sus daugh­ters of Cain but I think that is pret­ty lame. Typ­i­cal­ly, men who do evil are not called “sons of God” by the Lord but sons of Belial.

  9. Rick Beckman Avatar

    Or sons of wrath or perdi­tion or even of their father the dev­il. Agree with you totally!

  10. Wesley Taylor Avatar
    Wesley Taylor

    Oh, and I just want­ed to say what a bless­ing it is diss­cuss ( or just read in my case)openly the beau­ti­ful com­plex­i­ty of the bible with­out the over weigh­ing critis­cism that seem to bring a case closed atti­tude by the com­mon era chris­tians toward what is in the scrip­tures. Rick I have enjoyed read­ing sev­er­al of your post and its threads!

  11. Madeline Heijman Avatar
    Madeline Heijman

    We are curi­ous, who is the painter of the Cain & Abel art­work shown above. It is a masterpiece.
    Your prompt response is appreciated.

  12. andrea Avatar
    andrea

    cains line is from the evil one, adam was not his father, eve had sex with the dev­il also known as the snake, sex was the tree of all knowl­edge of good and evil, the dev­il took her vir­gin­i­ty and then she took adams, after that there­in­no­cense was tak­en and they felt emberassed with­out clothes,god spared him so that he could test his peo­ple . god is always tring to test us in some way. cain and abel were fater­nal twins mean­ing cain could have been from a dif­fer­ent father ( it hap­pens now today as well) if you think of all the things that his sons and there sons invent­ed and cre­at­ed„, well music now a days is crap , glob­al warm­ing due to polu­tion and well lets just say tech­nol­o­gy is going to be the death of us.we are suck­ing our plan­et dry with it, now im no hip­ocrite or hip­py i too use tech­nol­o­gy but just look at where it has got­ten us…we are killing our plan­et and minds.
    serpentseedline.com/ i found this web­site very use­full. when i went back and re read my bible itmade much sense. the things cains lin­eage did is more of a sto­ry on what not to do then it being ok.

  13. Jason Avatar
    Jason

    “Ser­pen­t’s seed?????”
    Where do you guys get this junk? The scrip­ture is clear and not at all fog­gy about where Cain is from:

    “And Adam knew Eve his wife, and she con­ceived and bore Cain…” The “And…and…and” gram­mar in Hebrew is known as the vav con­sec­u­tive; it’s a link­ing struc­ture (kin­da like a good semi­colon — it direct­ly ties the syn­tax togeth­er like a com­pound sen­tence, but leaves the clear sense of the con­text to guide the read­er in under­stand­ing just what is the link). 

    In Gen­e­sis 4:1, it could just as right­ly be trans­lat­ed “Now when Adam knew Eve his wife, she then con­ceived and lat­er bore Cain” or “While Adam was know­ing his wife she came to con­ceive and so bore Cain.” The struc­ture of the vav con­sec­u­tive with­in this sen­tence forms an impreg­nable (ahem), causal link between Adam’s inti­ma­cy with Eve and the con­cep­tion and birth of Cain. 

    That’s just part of how the lan­guage works. There is no room with­in the mean­ing of this Hebrew sen­tence to allow for even a hint of a shad­ow of some oth­er father for Cain. Any source that sug­gests oth­er­wise isn’t spec­u­la­tive­ly sup­ple­ment­ing some unspo­ken shad­ow of Bib­li­cal his­to­ry; it’s flat out con­tra­dict­ing the Bible (semi­colon, FTW!).

  14. Jason Avatar
    Jason

    Oops! “(kin­da like a good semi­colon —it direct­ly ties…” should read “(kin­da like a good semi­colon) direct­ly ties…”

    Semi­colon fail ;(

  15. Donna Avatar
    Donna

    Can some­one tell me why Abel is not list­ed in Adam’s fam­i­ly tree?
    Is it pos­si­ble that Adam was not his father?
    Could Abel be a kind of/ or Jesus in an ear­li­er vis­i­ta­tion to earth?
    Also, is it pos­si­ble that Adam was the devil?
    or at least had the dev­il indwelling him? After all he was will­ing to let Eve die by eat­ing the apple, (he did not tell her that she would die and then grab it away from her). He was con­tent to let her eat it and see what happened.
    I don’t mean to offend any­one but I want to be sure I know the truth.

  16. Minister Dante Fortson Avatar

    Peo­ple keep refer­ring to the line of Seth as “God­ly”… but if they were so God­ly, why did God wipe them all out in the flood, with the excep­tion of Noah’s fam­i­ly? Just food for thought.

  17. Joen Eriksen Avatar

    Hi.
    Cain was giv­en a mark, a sign that he should not be killed for his evil acts. The sign was his wife. And this explains the rea­son of sev­en­fold revenge for killing Cain. Let me explain
    The num­ber of Adam is sev­en. To begin with it was six, just like the rest of the crea­tures of the dust. But Adam was obe­di­ent to death. He fell into a deep sleep and got his female through this way con­trary to all oth­er crea­tures. And when the sev­enth day appeared. God raised Adam from the death on the sev­enth day. God FINISHED the sev­enth day through res­ur­rec­tion from the death. This explains why Adam was pun­ished with work and sweat. Adam was los­ing his state of rest and have to work and sweat.
    When he was raised from the death he was no longer alone. The woman was now cre­at­ed through res­ur­rec­tion into the sev­enth day. Her num­ber is sev­en like her husband.
    This explains why Cain receives a holy woman. He received a daugth­er of Adam and Eve to be his wife. A “God daugth­er.” The man is made holy by his wife and vise versa.
    This also explains why it is called a mys­tery, that a man appear with the num­ber 666. They were wiped out, right? They were wiped out from the face of the earth with Noah. The num­ber of Cain was six like his father the ser­pent who was of flesh and blood. He was not the dev­il. The dev­il is a spir­it. The ser­pent was a beast cre­at­ed of the field on the sixth day.
    And no, Cain was not the most evil when it comes to mea­sur­ing evilness.
    But the sev­enth from the ser­pent, the sixth from Cain, Lamech. He took him­self two wifes, and believed then to become twice as holy. To be revenged two times sev­en­fold for HIS killings. Because of his two wifes…
    God curs­ing Lamech comes from the prophet Enoch.
    Enochs prophe­cy tells us that DEATH is com­ing to wipe out all evil from the face of the earth. But he shall not live to see it hap­pen. He dies 4 years before Noah was born. Enoch did nev­er see the angel of death. He died before death/Noah was born. He who saw Jesus as a lit­tle child had already seen the sal­va­tion of the world. He who had seen Noah as a lit­tle child had already seen the judge­ment of the old world. That is how bible talks its hid­den language.
    And the bible does not say that Enoch did not die. In hebrews it is writ­ten that all these prophets died. Abel, Enoch, Noah, Sarah and Abra­ham. They all died, it is writ­ten, in hebrews. Enoch not see­ing death does not mean that he is not going to die. But this is the secret way of speak­ing spir­i­tu­al words in the bible. A prophet is also called a seer. The seer fore­saw death but did not see that death which he saw. This is a play with words. Very com­mon in the bible.
    The worst evil­ness of the days of Noah was the min­gling of seeds thou. The sons of God tak­ing them­selves daugth­ers of man. In direct terms this means: The sons of Adam took them­selves daugth­ers of Hi.
    Cain was giv­en a mark, a sign that he should not be killed for his evil acts. The sign was his wife. And this explains the rea­son of sev­en­fold revenge for killing Cain. Let me explain
    The num­ber of Adam is sev­en. To begin with it was six, just like the rest of the crea­tures of the dust. But Adam was obe­di­ent to death. He fell into a deep sleep and got his female through this way con­trary to all oth­er crea­tures. And when the sev­enth day appeared. God raised Adam from the death on the sev­enth day. God FINISHED the sev­enth day through res­ur­rec­tion from the death. This explains why Adam was pun­ished with work and sweat. Adam was los­ing his state of rest and have to work and sweat.
    When he was raised from the death he was no longer alone. The woman was now cre­at­ed through res­ur­rec­tion into the sev­enth day. Her num­ber is sev­en like her husband.
    This explains why Cain receives a holy woman. He received a daugth­er of Adam and Eve to be his wife. A “God daugth­er.” The man is made holy by his wife and vise versa.
    This also explains why it is called a mys­tery, that a man appear with the num­ber 666. They were wiped out, right? They were wiped out from the face of the earth with Noah. The num­ber of Cain was six like his father the ser­pent who was of flesh and blood. He was not the dev­il. The dev­il is a spir­it. The ser­pent was a beast cre­at­ed of the field on the sixth day.
    And no, Cain was not the most evil when it comes to mea­sur­ing evilness.
    But the sev­enth from the ser­pent, the sixth from Cain, Lamech. He took him­self two wifes, and believed then to become twice as holy. To be revenged two times sev­en­fold for HIS killings. Because of his two wifes…
    God curs­ing Lamech comes from the prophet Enoch.
    Enochs prophe­cy tells us that DEATH is com­ing to wipe out all evil from the face of the earth. But he shall not live to see it hap­pen. He dies 4 years before Noah was born. Enoch did nev­er see the angel of death. He died before death/Noah was born. He who saw Jesus as a lit­tle child had already seen the sal­va­tion of the world. He who had seen Noah as a lit­tle child had already seen the judge­ment of the old world. That is how bible talks its hid­den language.
    And the bible does not say that Enoch did not die. In hebrews it is writ­ten that all these prophets died. Abel, Enoch, Noah, Sarah and Abra­ham. They all died, it is writ­ten, in hebrews. Enoch not see­ing death does not mean that he is not going to die. But this is the secret way of speak­ing spir­i­tu­al words in the bible. A prophet is also called a seer. The seer fore­saw death but did not see that death which he saw. This is a play with words. Very com­mon in the bible.
    The worst evil­ness of the days of Noah was the min­gling of seeds. The sons of God tak­ing them­selves daugth­ers of man. In direct terms this means: The sons of Adam took them­selves daugh­ters of man. The sons of Cain were not God sons. But sons of man, Eve. She was cre­at­ed in the image of man. And the chil­dren that she got with the ser­pent were not God sons. They were hav­ing the sta­tus of being men because of their moth­er, Eve.
    This also explains why the gen­er­a­tion of Cain con­se­qent­ly are evil all the way, and the gen­er­a­tion of Adam, Set are good all the way up to the cre­at­ed sec­ond Adam, Jesus.

  18. Curious Universe Avatar
    Curious Universe

    While I appre­ci­ate bib­li­cal folk­lore admixed with truth of the day, the bible says that the Nephilim were destroyed in the days of Noah, yet rein­tro­duces them as alive and well lat­er on.

    Num­bers 13

    26 They came back to Moses and Aaron and the whole Israelite com­mu­ni­ty at Kadesh in the Desert of Paran. There they report­ed to them and to the whole assem­bly and showed them the fruit of the land. 27 They gave Moses this account: “We went into the land to which you sent us, and it does flow with milk and hon­ey! Here is its fruit. 28 But the peo­ple who live there are pow­er­ful, and the cities are for­ti­fied and very large. We even saw descen­dants of Anak there. 29 The Amalekites live in the Negev; the Hit­tites, Jebusites and Amor­ites live in the hill coun­try; and the Canaan­ites live near the sea and along the Jordan.”

    30 Then Caleb silenced the peo­ple before Moses and said, “We should go up and take pos­ses­sion of the land, for we can cer­tain­ly do it.”

    31 But the men who had gone up with him said, “We can’t attack those peo­ple; they are stronger than we are.” 32 And they spread among the Israelites a bad report about the land they had explored. They said, “The land we explored devours those liv­ing in it. All the peo­ple we saw there are of great size. 33 We saw the Nephilim there (the descen­dants of Anak come from the Nephilim). We seemed like grasshop­pers in our own eyes, and we looked the same to them.”

  19. Neil Gellibrand Avatar
    Neil Gellibrand

    I have shared your curios­i­ty over the amount of Bible info con­cern­ing Cain’s descen­dants. My search for answers revealed that they were not destroyed with all life on the face of the Earth, because they had already been dri­ven from the face of the Earth by God, and not sub­ject to God’s destruc­tion by the flood. They are the “wise ones” in the para­ble, that built their house on the rock and it was not destroyed by the flood. Jesus used a true exam­ple to base his para­ble on, and it had of course to be the flood of Noah’s time. They only need­ed a tow­er of 15 cubits on the top of the moun­tain to clear the water, and this would not be dif­fi­cult for the 8 cubit plus giants who exist­ed then and after the flood. While the water was reced­ing the tops of the moun­tains were vis­i­ble while the face of the Earth was still cov­ered. Cain’s descen­dants would know well that if God told some­one to build a large ark that they had bet­ter be pre­pared for high water. These are the ‘sons of god’ that vis­it­ed those on the face of the Earth, com­ing down from their obscured retreat in the clouds. These are the real peo­ple, the mighty ones that leg­ends are based on.

  20. Mishka Avatar
    Mishka

    The cor­rect trans­la­tion for Cain’s line is not “ungod­ly” but ‘not of god’, as with Seth’s line not bein“godly” but ‘of god’.
    Cain means ‘acquired’, a strange name to give one’s first born ie, a bla­tant state­ment from Adam that the first­born was­n’t his.
    Abel means ‘first of god’ or ‘god’s first’, an equal­ly strange name to give one’s sec­ond son.
    Seen from this per­spec­tive it is far more under­stand­able why Cain mur­dered his half-broth­er Abel.
    Yaweh did not recog­nise Cain’s sta­tus as the first born and instead gave favour and the sta­tus of first­born to Abel.
    By killing Abel he removed all pos­si­bil­i­ty that Adam“s line would devel­op in its purest form, as well as being a blow against Jaweh who had cre­at­ed Adam using his own DNA, Cain’s male DNA com­po­nent came from one of those opposed to Yaweh, most like­ly the Lord of Light.

    1. cocofine Avatar
      cocofine

      If one is un God­ly he is also not of God, Man was cre­at­ed by God but man is not un- God­ly because he has God’s genes. Unlike Cain who has the genes of Satan. Ungod­li­ness is not of the behav­ior, then it would be unGod­ly like.

      1. Rick Beckman Avatar

        Satan and God have genes? Fas­ci­nat­ing. Please, enlight­en us. Can we use genet­ic mod­i­fi­ca­tion to place God genes into a fly to cre­ate an all-pow­er­ful fly?

  21. cocofine Avatar
    cocofine

    you are real­ly stretch­ing it, the wound that lamech received was more like­ly an insult and not a phys­i­cal wound. And Lamech reac­tion was mur­der­ing the man. This would have been an over reac­tion which maybe why Lamech was sure that he would have a neg­a­tive reac­tion by God. Cain was half human and half evil angel because he was the son of Satan, so cain nature would have been noth­ing but pure evil as well as his chil­dren Cain did not have the nature of Adam because he was not Adams son. But Seth was Adams son and also had the nature of Adam, unlike Cain. does Satan have total dis­re­gard for the lives of oth­ers then so does his chil­dren just like his son cain. Cain response to Able was total­ly unnec­es­sary there was no rea­son to kill Able sim­ply because Cain was jeal­ous of Able. This proves that Cain line has no regard for the life of oth­ers and lamach also show that the line has no regard for the life of others.

    1. Rick Beckman Avatar

      So it’s a stretch to think that a wound is a phys­i­cal wound, but you can make the leap that Cain was part “evil angel” with­out a shred of bib­li­cal proof and to you that’s a log­i­cal step rather than a huge stretch?

      Right…

  22. F Kramer Avatar
    F Kramer

    Well it seems we have over­looked Noah’ wife. Shem, Ham, and Japheth wives’
    as well.

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Rick Beckman