Church Organization — Just Tossing This Out There

A lack of time and a lack of a near­by Bible means that this is going to be short and sweet, essen­tial­ly just to see if I can get any feed­back on it. Dur­ing my Chris­t­ian life, I have become most accus­tomed to and accept­ing of the Bap­tist way of doing things. Of the sev­er­al church­es I’ve been to in my life, most have been Bap­tist (and all the ones I have reg­u­lar­ly attend­ed have been Bap­tist of one kind or anoth­er). And while many were sim­i­lar (the Catholic church­es being the not­ed excep­tion), I became con­vinced that the Bap­tist church was the “church of the Bible” in how it was orga­nized and run. 

Over the past year, how­ev­er, I have not only real­ized how igno­rant I was but have tried to fig­ure out the Bib­li­cal way of run­ning a church.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I real­ize there aren’t a great deal of vers­es which describe in detail how a church is to be run. Look­ing over church char­ters, rules of order, con­sti­tu­tions or any oth­er tra­di­tion­al doc­u­ment may make you think the Bible is full of proof that a cer­tain church is doing things the right way.

With­out fur­ther ado, here is what I can recall from mem­o­ry thus far:

First off, let’s get this out of the way: there is no “mis­sion­ary” in the Bible. I’ve searched the word of God, and that title is not to be found. The work of a mis­sion­ary, how­ev­er, is in the Scrip­tures, although God calls that work the work of an evangelist.

Which means that mod­ern day evan­ge­lists who trav­el around to estab­lished church­es, preach to the choir, col­lect an offer­ing, and teach their kids to play a mul­ti­tude of instru­ments are not in the Bible. I can’t find any­thing even close to that in the Bible.

So we have evan­ge­lists, of which the apos­tles were the first. These men trav­el to an area where the Gospel has not been preached or to where it has been for­got­ten, to an area with no estab­lished com­mu­ni­ty of believ­ers. Upon win­ning souls, the evan­ge­list orga­nizes them into a fel­low­ship, an assem­bly, and dis­ci­ples them, even­tu­al­ly lead­ing to a god­ly man to accept the call­ing of pas­tor, to take over the work of the evan­ge­list at that church so that the evan­ge­list can move on to the next area.

The pas­tor (which is a spe­cif­ic call­ing and which car­ries no pre­req­ui­sites or require­ments) is respon­si­ble for the flock, for its teach­ing, etc. He will need to spend a vast major­i­ty of his time study­ing the word of God, grow­ing in Christ, so that he may be an exam­ple in var­i­ous ways to those around him. Tim­o­thy was a pas­tor, and we can see the var­i­ous instruc­tions to him in 1 Timothy.

As pas­tor, he is required to appoint var­i­ous lead­ers with­in the church: elders (bish­ops, over­seers) and dea­cons. These offices are not gifts of God and do have require­ments, which the Holy Ghost lists to Timothy.

Elders would seem to be in charge of the spir­i­tu­al affairs of the church and the dea­cons over the tem­po­ral. It would also seem that they have a hand in church dis­ci­pline, in silenc­ing false teach­ers, in main­tain­ing church order, etc.

The con­gre­ga­tion itself has no author­i­ty in a church, and even con­gre­ga­tion­al vot­ing is for­eign to the Bible’s teach­ings. The pas­tor is not a pas­tor if his sheep are lead­ing him. The over­seers are not over­seers if those who they over­see are over­see­ing them. Bib­li­cal­ly, the pas­tors will be held account­able for the author­i­ty they hold, yet so many mod­ern church­es want to pass that author­i­ty on to the con­gre­ga­tion while still hold­ing the pas­tor accountable.

As far as the church is run, it would seem that the ser­mon ougth to be the focal point. That is what peo­ple ought to come for, to be fed from the word of God. The pas­tor spends count­less hours study­ing to show him­self approved before God so that he can preach, not so that he can sit on the side­lines while ten songs are sung, twen­ty announce­ments are shared, and while women and chil­dren do their thing at the front.

From what I’ve seen, scrip­tural­ly, after a ser­mon is giv­en, a hymn is sang and they are dis­missed or the com­mu­nion sup­per is par­tak­en of. (Oh, and this sup­per was more spe­cial than a store-bought box of wafers and Welch’s Grape Juice, by the way… Ought not the Lord’s body and blood be rep­re­sent­ed by the fresh­est, purest things that we have available?)

And what about all the super­fluities that have per­vad­ed our church­es? Let’s run down a list of things which we have added to the gath­er­ing of our­selves togeth­er which God nev­er added:

1) kneel­ing altars
2) choirs
3) build­ing programs
4) con­sti­tu­tions, by-laws, etc.
5) Sun­day school
6) children’s/junior/wee church
7) Christ­mas programs
8) bap­tism ceremonies
9) mem­ber­ship rolls
10) “bap­tism for membership”
11) “let­ters of membership”
12) busi­ness meetings
13) secret sisters
14) youth groups
15) and many more, espe­cial­ly when the more litur­gi­cal church­es are considered…

I’ve read “stud­ies” of Bap­tist preach­ers want­i­ng to defend their church orga­ni­za­tion which grasp onto the lit­tlest bits of Scrip­ture and evolve it into a whole way of doing things. The souls which were added to the num­ber of the saved at Pen­te­cost is enough for many to jus­ti­fy keep­ing a church roll or that bap­tism is required for church membership.

Why is it so dif­fi­cult to pick up the Bible and apply its teach­ings whol­ly, with­out regard for tra­di­tions? Are we so afraid of run­ning a church as the Bible describes?

Hon­est­ly, I think that we are. If we get rid of all the extra-pas­toral pro­grams such as youth groups, restrict women from teach­ing, put chil­dren under the pas­tor where they belong, ditch the fan­cy music pro­grams and choirs, and put the focus on the word of God, the mem­ber­ship rolls will prob­a­bly trick­le. There is a rea­son why when a new church opens up, peo­ple flock to it. Peo­ple like nice build­ings. But if a church repents of its tra­di­tions, re-orga­nizes, and promis­es an empha­sis on Bible teach­ing and preach­ing, will that get more peo­ple in the doors? Actu­al­ly, peo­ple will prob­a­bly start leav­ing. Those car­nal Chris­tians who show up will leave because when the Bible is giv­en to them in an unadul­ter­at­ed, unob­scured way, they will feel its conviction.

And of course, we can’t offend peo­ple by doing that, now can we. Of course we can, and we should. Church­es ought not encour­age vis­its from peo­ple only look­ing for a reli­gious fix.

Here’s an idea: On the Christ­mas and East­er ser­vices when peo­ple flock to the church­es of God to cel­e­brate pagan fes­ti­vals, don’t preach the mes­sages they expect to hear. Give your new­found audi­ence the dose of God’s word that they need. Preach repen­tance, preach god­ly sor­row, preach the Gospel, preach what your audi­ence needs. Not to dis­cred­it that por­tion of Scrip­tures, but every­one knows the sto­ry of Jesus’ birth (but far too few of us know it has noth­ing to do with Decem­ber 25). Preach the mes­sage that needs preached.

Preach the Bible. Focus on the Bible. And even if a voice from Heav­en tells you oth­er­wise, you have a more sure word of proph­esy in the Bible. Preach it. Fol­low it. Your num­bers may drop, your income as a pas­tor may dwin­dle. Preach it. Fol­low it. Those who stay will be strength­ened, and your assem­bly will be bet­ter off because of it.

And if they don’t, if your assem­bly is beyond repair or if they are sim­ply trapped in car­nal ways and man-made tra­di­tion, take the advice the Spir­it gave to Tim­o­thy con­cern­ing his pas­torate: “do the work of an evan­ge­list.” Leave the assem­bly you’re at and go win new souls to Christ and begin again, hop­ing for bet­ter results.

As I wrap up, I want to touch on a few final things…

There is no bib­li­cal thing as an “asso­ciate pas­tor,” a “youth pas­tor,” a “cou­ples pas­tor,” or any oth­er non­sense. And while there may be mul­ti­ple elders, there is no such thing as a “youth elder,” “cou­ples elder,” or any such non­sense either.

Yes, I do believe that chil­dren ought to be in the “adult ser­vice” (which ought to be the “every­one ser­vice”). The pas­tor is over the whole church and is respon­si­ble for every­one, not just the adults. Chil­dren don’t need watered down ver­sions of the truth, fan­cy pic­tures, or any­thing else. If they are inca­pable of sit­ting through a Sun­day ser­vice, how do they sit through school? It is the fault of the par­ents for not rais­ing chil­dren to love church, to hunger for the word of God, and to respect the pas­tor in his teaching.

And who typ­i­cal­ly leads chil­dren’s ser­vices? Women. The same women that church­es won’t let preach to the adults they let loose on the chil­dren. Yet still God says that He suf­fers not a woman to teach with­in the assem­bly. He does, how­ev­er, give instruc­tions to elder women telling them to teach younger women to (not “how to”; just “to”) love their hus­bands, to love their chil­dren, to be dis­creet, to be chaste, to be obe­di­ent to their hus­bands (GASP!), and so on. It’s no won­der women are aban­don­ing the admo­ni­tions of the Lord con­cern­ing dress­ing decent­ly, keep­ing long hair or wear­ing a head cov­er­ing, not tak­ing author­i­ty over a man, etc. The elder women are no longer teach­ing them to do these things! And chil­dren who grow up being taught by women with short hair who only dress mod­est­ly on Sun­days are going to grow up and believe that such things are unnec­es­sary as their beloved Sun­day school teach­ers felt that they were.

Find me a bib­li­cal church in my area, and I will fel­low­ship there. How­ev­er, I am con­vinced that there aren’t any. And I can’t “start one” with­out being a God-called evan­ge­list, which as of yet He has­n’t revealed to me. So for me to “start one” would require a like-mind­ed evan­ge­list (i.e., one who believes the Bible) to come to my area, start a church, and some­how have me find out about it. Were I to do all that with­out being a called evan­ge­list, I would be a hyp­ocrite in light of every­thing I said above. And were I an evan­ge­list, I would­n’t be stay­ing at the church, I’d be con­stant­ly mov­ing to new areas, repeat­ing what I did here.

It isn’t entire­ly impos­si­ble for me to be called to be a pas­tor, were an evan­ge­list here to rec­og­nize me as such and to place me over a con­gre­ga­tion. Yes, I’m young; so was Timothy–so much so that God Him­self had to tell him to let no one despise his youth. Who God places in author­i­ty ought to be trust­ed, just as Josi­ah the eight-year-old king of Israel was. And were that to hap­pen, I am entire­ly con­vinced that I would have to quit my job at Wal-mart. A pas­tor can­not be avail­able to his con­gre­ga­tion at all times if he has pri­or com­mit­ments. A pas­tor can­not be free to study the word of God as much as nec­es­sary with pri­or com­mit­ments. A pas­tor can­not be ready to preach, instant, in sea­son and out of sea­son, if he has pri­or com­mit­ments. There is a rea­son why the Lord has ordained that those who preach the gospel ought to be able to live of the gospel.

Okay, I’m done. Any com­ments you can give, please do so. And if you just hap­pen to be an evangelist… 

Update: Okay, so it was­n’t as “short and sweet” as I had antic­i­pat­ed… Thanks, Mike, for point­ing that out; I had for­got­ten I put that.

Update 2: Not that I don’t appre­ci­ate the pub­lic­i­ty, but this “poor guy” would like to know just what he has back­wards… There’s a com­ment form for a reason. :)

13 thoughts on “Church Organization — Just Tossing This Out There”

  1. Rick,

    This has got to be one of the wack­i­est posts I have ever read. The
    trin­i­ty is not specif­i­cal­ly men­tioned in the Bible, but I would assume you would adhere to it. But then again accord­ing to the log­ic in this post, I guess if you don’t see the word trin­i­ty in the Bible, you couldn’t believe it, because it is not in the Bible.

    Wait to you have chil­dren, and then let me know if you agree with the post you just wrote, about hav­ing pro­grams for kids is unbib­li­cal because you can’t find children’s pro­grams in the Bible.

    You remind me of a post Phil John­son just wrote about a guy named Dar­win Fish http://phillipjohnson.blogspot.com/2005/09/why-is-distinction-between-essential.html You seemed to have a prob­lem with just about every­body and every­thing. How did you get so judg­men­tal? For you to say that you can not find any church in your area that is bib­li­cal is crazy, and that you need to start one so you can have a tru­ly bib­li­cal church.

    Accord­ing to Lev 15, if your wife is unclean dur­ing her men­stru­al cycle, and every­thing she touch­es is unclean and needs to be washed. Do you believe this?

    Deut. 21 — Says that if you have a rebel­lions child you are to take them out and stone them. Do you believe this?

    Deut 25 — Says that if your sis­ter-in-law is wid­owed, you are sup­posed to take her as your wife and have sex with her. Do you believe this? If not why not….it is in the Bible.

    {{{Can­dle­man}}}

  2. The
    trin­i­ty is not specif­i­cal­ly men­tioned in the Bible, but I would assume you would adhere to it. But then again accord­ing to the log­ic in this post, I guess if you don’t see the word trin­i­ty in the Bible, you couldn’t believe it, because it is not in the Bible.

    It does­n’t mat­ter if God is referred to as “a Trin­i­ty” or not; the Bible teach­es that He is Three in One and thus is a Trin­i­ty. There’s ample Scrip­ture to sup­port that.

    Wait to you have chil­dren, and then let me know if you agree with the post you just wrote, about hav­ing pro­grams for kids is unbib­li­cal because you can’t find chil­dren’s pro­grams in the Bible.

    I’d much rather my chil­dren (when I have them) learn the meat of the Word. If God did­n’t find chil­dren’s ser­vices and Sun­day schools (and even ele­men­tary schools, for that mat­ter) impor­tant enough to men­tion, who is man to say they are important?

    God killed peo­ple in the Old Tes­ta­ment for wor­ship­ping Him sim­ply because they were doing so in a man­ner incon­sis­tent with His word. I’m not expert, but if God hat­ed it then, He’s still going to hate it now. There is a rea­son He gave us His word; He told us how to wor­ship Him. Even with “good inten­tions,” we should­n’t think it wise to add to that, whether He’s allow­ing us to or not.

    You seemed to have a prob­lem with just about every­body and everything.

    It’s amaz­ing how much God has a prob­lem with, but I guess it is eas­i­er to crit­i­cize our brethren for hav­ing the same issues. I don’t have a prob­lem, first off; I attend a fun­da­men­tal Bap­tist church com­plete with many of the super­flu­ous things I men­tioned in the post above. And I love it there.

    How­ev­er, I love the word of God and the truth con­tained there­in; there­fore, I strive for a more excel­lent way, a way which comes into line with the teach­ings of the word, eschew­ing the super­flu­ous tra­di­tions and meth­ods of man.

    It’s inter­est­ing to note that begin­ning with twelve men, the entire world had the gospel preached to them with­in a mat­ter of a few decades. They weren’t entan­gled with reli­gion; they sim­ply got the job done. There are far more who claim the name of Christ today, and can we say that the gospel has been preached to every sin­ner on Earth? No way! But they could.

    How did you get so judgmental?

    Why not? There’s noth­ing wrong with it. “Judge right­eous judg­ment,” “prove all things,” “try the spir­its,” and “sin not” are all com­mands which require judg­ing on our parts.

    For you to say that you can not find any church in your area that is bib­li­cal is crazy, and that you need to start one so you can have a tru­ly bib­li­cal church.

    There weren’t many bib­li­cal church­es in Paul’s day, either; if there were, the Spir­it would­n’t have need­ed to rebuke and instruct so many of them on what they were doing wrong… And Scrip­ture teach­es that sin shall wax worse and that church­es shall grow far­ther from the truth, so we should not be sur­prised that church­es of today are becom­ing more and more removed from the teach­ings of the word of God.

    Accord­ing to Lev 15, if your wife is unclean dur­ing her men­stru­al cycle, and every­thing she touch­es is unclean and needs to be washed. Do you believe this?

    Deut. 21 — Says that if you have a rebel­lions child you are to take them out and stone them. Do you believe this?

    Deut 25 — Says that if your sis­ter-in-law is wid­owed, you are sup­posed to take her as your wife and have sex with her. Do you believe this? If not why not….it is in the Bible.

    Whole­hearti­ly, and if I ever con­vert to Judaism I will prac­tice that. Until then, I will right­ly divide the word of God and let the com­mands giv­en to the Israelites remain with­in Judaism. I am nei­ther Gen­tile nor Jew. I am a Chris­t­ian, and the word rebukes any who would bring such back under the yoke of the Law.

    Here’s a ques­tion for you: Why are you okay with com­pro­mis­ing the puri­ty of the church to allow for devi­a­tions from the mod­el God gave us rather than encour­ag­ing a return to the prac­tices and teach­ings that the Spir­it actu­al­ly taught us?

    Or, to put it anoth­er way, why crit­i­cize a broth­er for stand­ing up for the word of God with­out ever giv­ing a verse of Scrip­ture show­ing where he’s wrong? The only time you used scrip­ture was to strive about laws which I am whol­ly free from.

    Thanks for your com­ments, though.

  3. broth­er Rick,

    You need to find an assem­bly of Chris­tians gath­ered unto the Name of the Lord Jesus Christ. A direc­to­ry can be found at gospelhall.org

    You have found truths in the Bible that many oth­ers have come to the same con­clu­sions about. How­ev­er, your knowl­edge of pastors/elders has been swayed by your Bap­tist expe­ri­ances more than the scrip­tures. May I sug­gest check­ing out http:www.foolforhim.com/whatchurchdoyougoto.htm and an arti­cle by Mark Frees about the one-Pas­tor sys­tem [if you can’t find this from google, I’ll get if for you].

    sin­cer­ly,
    Chuck

  4. Chuck,

    I would love to find a Gospel Hall near here. Ever since Bran­don first told me what a Gospel Hall/Plymouth Brethren church was, I was fas­ci­nat­ed. But the clos­est ones it seems like are a few hours away in Ohio.

    I’ll check out those arti­cles you suggested.

    God bless,
    Rick

  5. Chuck,

    I would love to find a Gospel Hall near here. Ever since Bran­don first told me what a Gospel Hall/Plymouth Brethren church was, I was fas­ci­nat­ed. But the clos­est ones it seems like are a few hours away in Ohio.

    I’ll check out those arti­cles you suggested.

    God bless,
    Rick

  6. Wow I can’t believe there’s actu­al­ly some­one with the same beliefs!!!
    Cur­rent­ly my fam­i­ly and I are not attend­ing any church. We just can’t find one that fol­lows the Bible as it is.
    =(

  7. The only think i dis­sagree with is the trin­i­ty, because like some­one wrote it’s not men­tioned in the Bible. And I think the bap­tism should be made in the name of Jesus like the apos­tles did.

  8. It should be not­ed well that though the “Trin­i­ty” is not men­tioned by name in the Bible, the con­cept is taught from Gen­e­sis to Rev­e­la­tion; “Trin­i­ty” is just a name ascribed to it, sim­i­lar to ascrib­ing “hypo­sta­t­ic union” to the con­cept of Jesus being both God and man simultaneously.

    Also, Jesus com­mand­ed Bap­tism to be done in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, but at the same time, no one ever bap­tized some­one say­ing, “I bap­tize you in the name of…” like so often church­es do. Bap­tism was not a rote rit­u­al with a spo­ken script; doing some­thing “in the name of” was a mat­ter of heart. Sim­i­lar­ly, pray­ing or ask­ing any­thing “in Jesus’ name” does not require one to say, “In Jesus’ name, amen.” It sim­ply requires that to be the atti­tude of the heart.

  9. So what is the prob­lem with the youth choir’s, and teach­ing chil­dren at an appropi­ate lev­el and all that again. 

    Its not in the bible. 

    But sure­ly not every­thing is express­ly in the bible (the trin­i­ty for the begin­ing) so why then does every prac­tice of reli­gion have to be express­ly in the bible. I mean it like this, God changes, (we see that quite clear­ly as we progress along the books) and we are made in his image, and as such, we change as well. 

    How can you say with cer­tain­i­ty that our wor­ship was nev­er to change (while keep­ing the key ele­ments in place, I’m not try­ing to make way for apos­ta­sy but youth choirs here). It would seem to be against ours and gods nature to nev­er embrace change or admit wrongs (or accept sal­va­tion) so why can’t we have some diver­si­ty in our churches. 

    I’m real­ly glad you dont think your an evan­ge­list, because quite frankly you would suck as one. The whole ‘if they dont like it let them leave’ bit is more than a lit­tle moron­ic. If the mes­sage of god is as impor­tant as I am will­ing to wager you think it is, then should­n’t we make that mes­sage appeal­ing. Even if , in mak­ing it appeal­ing, we are putting hard­ships on the lis­ten­ers, is it not bet­ter that they lis­ten then turn away. Is it not bet­ter that they be on the right path (even the path where they may slip and stum­ble because of vari­a­tions or hon­eyed mes­sages) then to turn away from the lord entire­ly. If some­one takes Jesus Christ as there per­son­al sav­iour because of a women, is that all of a sud­den ‘not good enough’ because quite frankly, I thought that was the goal. When you put the means above the end point, I can only call it hubris and dog­ma of the worst kind.

  10. There were a few priests in the Old Tes­ta­ment who offered “strange fire” in the wor­ship of the Lord. It was “strange” because God had not com­mand­ed it. They took wor­ship into their own hands — their hearts were right, but they were adding to God’s plan of wor­ship. And God killed them for it.

    No, God does not change. The Scrip­tures express­ly say that. Any­one who thinks He does change is show­ing mis­un­der­stand­ing of the har­mo­ny of the Scrip­tures. The same God who rained plagues down upon Egypt is the same God who is putting up with Amer­i­ca today. And we see in the Rev­e­la­tion what shall hap­pen when His patience is exhausted.

    And no, it’s not our job to make the mes­sage appeal­ing. We’re to preach the Gospel so bold­ly that peo­ple will hate us, stone us, run us out of town. Jesus was so bold that by the time He was put to death, only a hand­ful of peo­ple still fol­lowed Him — only about fif­teen or so. It was very clear that the truth was so impor­tant to Jesus that He could not imag­ine dumb­ing it down or mak­ing it “seek­er sen­si­tive” to attract num­bers. Hun­dreds walked away from Him because His doc­trine was too hard.

    If we love Jesus, then we ought to care as much about His truth as He did so that we will not be enticed to mod­i­fy it just to attract numbers.

    And we must love God enough to respect how He desired us to wor­ship rather than invent­ing strange (read: extra­bib­li­cal) meth­ods. His Word is com­plete and suf­fi­cient to guide us through all mat­ters of spir­i­tu­al­i­ty, even worship.

  11. Rich, I have no doubt that you have read the scrip­tures, but have you lis­tened to the scriptures. 

    »If we love Jesus, then we ought to care as much about His truth as He did so that »we will not be enticed to mod­i­fy it just to attract numbers.

    I nev­er said that we ought to mod­i­fy the truth of the lord, what I said is that we ought to make it acces­si­ble, because Jesus/god loves all of us and wants all of us to obey him. Much in the same way, two peo­ple can read the same writ­ting and get two very dif­fer­ent things from it (like you and me) the same truth can be pre­sent­ed in more than one way. If you believe that the good news has to get out there, but are not will­ing to get it out there. Who real­ly has the incon­sis­tant position. 

    »His Word is com­plete and suf­fi­cient to guide us through all mat­ters of spir­i­tu­al­i­ty, »even worship.

    Here, I would like to see a quote for the suf­fi­cient bit. I would say that his word is com­plete and nec­es­sary to guide us through all mat­ters. Nec­es­sary does not pre­clude oth­er efforts or mea­sures to take. (Suf­fi­cient does not either, but Nec­es­sary makes it more clear. If it is suf­fi­cient to have 100 work­ers to do a task, and instead we have 150 does that change the suf­fi­cient nature of 100 works? No? Is it a bad thing to have more work­ers? Of Course not. 

    To repeat.

    I nev­er said that his truth should be mod­i­fied, mere­ly that it may be bet­ter under­stood with some expla­na­tion and com­mu­ni­ty, which i feel are in line with the bible, rather than with stern admon­ish­ments about completeness. 

    Suf­fi­cient does not pre­clude extra or over and above efforts. 

    Go with the Lord

    Ps: I would say that the essence of for­giv­ness is change. Before god would have sent us to hell and after, he would have accept­ed us into heav­en. How is that not a change in god (Jews to Chris­tians, Floods, to promis­es nev­er to flood, Plagues and war to love, father to son. I dis­agree with you that god is not change, regard­less of how har­mo­neous you believe the old tes­ti­ment is to the new testiment.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Use your Gravatar-enabled email address while commenting to automatically enhance your comment with some of Gravatar's open profile data.

Comments must be made in accordance with the comment policy. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam; learn how your comment data is processed.

You may use Markdown to format your comments; additionally, these HTML tags and attributes may be used: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Rick Beckman