20 Things They Won’t Teach You in Seminary

Chutney’s 20 Things They Won’t Teach You in Seminary.

I know for a fact that most churches out there deal with many (all?) of those things. Now, I ask a simple questions: If any of these things were essential to a church or beneficial to it in any way, why does God never tell us about such things as church by-laws or committees or Masters of Divinity degrees?

How beautiful is the thought of a simple gathering of believers in homes, invited in by those who love their brethren. How beautiful the thought of a group of people living according to the principles of Scripture, and not the mountains of traditions that have been heaped thereupon.

“It was good enough for Paul, so it’s good enough for me!” doesn’t quite work with KJV-Onlyism (Yes, I have seen that phrase abused as such), but shouldn’t it work for our gathering together as believers?

With only the Bible to answer from, I must say yes, it should work for us. The church doesn’t need to change with the culture if we truly believe that God is making new creatuers out of us when we are born from above. Culture should be a non-issue for the assemblies.

2 thoughts on “20 Things They Won’t Teach You in Seminary”

  1. “Now, I ask a simple questions: If any of these things were essential to a church or beneficial to it in any way, why does God never tell us about such things as church by-laws or committees or Masters of Divinity degrees?”

    Seriously … the things required of “ministers” as “articulated” by your God in your bible make the above look ridiculously simple and much more practical given our social context and current epoch. Seriously, should I slay a few bulls in place of a contemporary ordination service … or something to the effect?

    Also, God never “mentions” a word about driving to church … does that mean it too is a non-essential? Should we all stop it immediately and meet in ritualistic little gatherings within walking distance? Electric is never mentioned either? Another non-essential? Maybe. I think you get my point.

    If yours is a life limited to those things “mentioned by God,” then what a limited life it must be.

    All that to say … “Academically trained clergy is a good thing …” Go seminary Go!

    1. Your point is one that is often made. However, you are failing to neglect between things actually mentioned in Scripture (e.g., meeting in homes, church leadership, etc.) and those things which are merely circumstantial: whether a home has indoor plumbing, the means used to arrive at the home, whether shoes were worn or not, or who got to sit in the recliner.

      The teaching is known as the “Regulative Principle,” which calls Christians to worship only as God has asked us to, presuming that He was wise enough to tell us everything required in His worship, and not leaving us to our own to make up new ways of worship. This principle can be found throughout the Bible, and Paul gives a beautiful defense of it in Colossians 2.

      And no, no slaying of bulls is necessary. I can’t recall bulls slain anywhere when elders are appointed in Acts and elsewhere in the NT.

      The NT has evangelists going forth (today we call them “missionaries” for whatever reason), working to form a gathering of believers in an area and appointing elders over that assembly from within them. No mention at all is given to formal training, credentials, etc. The only thing I can find close to that is the instruction that an elder should not be “a novice,” but it seems too much to read into that the requirement of a degree.

      It is a great comfort knowing that the Church was founded a few men who followed Christ, a group which included those who were unlearned and uneducated.

      God doesn’t need smart men. He needs men who simply believe in Him and are willing to serve. (In other words, He needs men who are wise–something formal education cannot teach as well as, for example, personal study through the Proverbs.)

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